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John Whittlesea

Linear slides and telescopic slides – what is the difference?

Author: John Whittlesea, Technical support manager

4th Nov 2015

Watch these two videos to understand the difference between linear and telescopic slides.

A telescopic slide can have either partial or full extension, where the fixed member remains within the confines of the application and the moving member carries the moving element out of the application, to give access to it.

The moving element of a linear slide moves within the length of the fixed member and can be either a traditional ball bearing slide with a full ball retainer or a recirculating slide design where the balls are contained within the length of the moving element.

If you need further help please contact us by emailing [email protected] or call your local Accuride office.

Sue Witkowski

I want to add a keyboard shelf to my desk – any suggestions?

Author: Sue Witkowski, Marketing services manager

7th Oct 2015

If you want to add a retracting keyboard shelf beneath a desk then the 2109 slide is an obvious choice.

The 2109 slide comes with height adjustable brackets that fix to the underside of the desk. Optional clip on brackets (633xx) can also be used to bottom mount the slide to the shelf. Alternatively, the drawer member could simply be screw fixed to the side of the keyboard shelf.

If you want a ready made shelf then look at our keyboard trays.

There are three versions; EGTRAY-201, CBERGO-TRAY200 and CBERGOTRAY-300.

A more sophisticated option is using a sit-stand keyboard arm and tray: ASET-017.

The height adjustable arm is fitted to the underside of the desk on a guide track. This allows the whole system to be retracted when not in use and then slid out and placed at the correct height and tilt for the user.

John Whittlesea

Ask our slide experts about your telescopic or linear slide problem

Author: John Whittlesea, Technical support manager

8th Sep 2015

We receive all sorts of questions about slides and we will continue to publish them, with our answers, on the Accuride blog.

We hope that these answers will be useful to you, but if there is a question that we haven’t covered, please send it to [email protected]

I would like to pull drawers out of a 1m deep bay in the wall

Accuride has several stock slides of 1m in length. It is important that you consider that the width of the drawer and load are both important when selecting the correct slide.

We presume that you need a full extension slide so that you have full access to the drawer. Both the 5321 and 9300 series slides are sold in long lengths. We also stock some very heavy duty aluminium slides, but we feel that these may be too large for this type of project.

Also consider any additional features that would be useful for this application, for example, soft-close, lock-in and out, and mounting options.

Read John’s articles about load ratings and drawer widths before choosing the slide you need.

I am making some drawers to fit beneath a bed that I’ve made. Each drawer will be approximately 60cm wide x 71cm deep x 15cm high and will store clothes. Are there advantages to the 3/4 versus full extension slides? Also, if the drawers are 71cm deep do I need a 71cm long slide or will using a 65cm or 70cm work OK?

The decision to go for partial extension versus full extension is down to the type of access and the available space around the bed. If full access is important then go for the full extension slide type. If the space available around the bed is restricted or you do not need full access, then the partial extension slide may be the option to go for. They will both perform well in this type of application.

Providing the drawer width does not exceed the slide length, the available slide lengths of 60 cm, 65 cm or 70 cm will all be suitable. With the shorter length slide some access to the back of the drawer will be lost due to the shorter travel. If access is the important criteria, then go for the 70 cm option.

Where on the drawer side should I mount the slide - middle, top or bottom?

We have found, through tests and experience, that the optimum position is between 1/3 and 2/3 distance from the base of the drawer. Therefore the ideal position is on or just below the centreline as illustrated.

This will give you maximum stability for your drawer project.

However there are many and varied ways to mount drawers on slides; see our good and bad options on page 170 of our latest catalogue.

Sue Witkowski

Accuride USA demonstrates Senseon access control at Las Vegas woodworking show

Author: Sue Witkowski, Marketing services manager

28th Jul 2015

The access control system from Accuride, branded Senseon, is being demonstrated in a retail environment. It uses RFID technology and electronic locks integrated with side mount and under mount slides, including a touch release and soft close version.

Read more here

John Whittlesea

Ball migration – a common issue with ball bearing slides

Author: John Whittlesea, Technical support manager

24th Jun 2015

We recently received an interesting question from a company looking for drawer slides. Their worry concerned something they called ‘drawer creep’.

The problem mainly occurs when the drawer is repeatedly partly opened and not to the full extent of its travel.

When this happens often enough the ball cages (retainers) start to shift out of position and because the ball retainers form part of the slide’s stopping arrangement this causes the drawer to stop in the wrong place.

This generally means that the slide will stop short of its fully open position. Sometimes the slide will neither open nor close fully, but mostly it is the open position that is affected.

If the slide does stop in the wrong place then the only way to overcome this is by forcing the moving element to its fully open or closed position by pulling sharply on the slide or by slamming it. This should overcome the non rolling friction of the balls and force the slide back into the correct position.

We more commonly call this problem ‘ball migration’ and unfortunately this is a characteristic of all ball bearing slides, not just Accuride slides.

How to prevent ball migration

When drawer slides are repeatedly opened to their full extension, the balls and retainers will stay in their correct position within the tracks and the slides will continue to give perfect service.

If partial openings are common practice, then it would be good practice to occasionally cycle the moving element (normally a drawer) to its full extent. This will ensure that the balls and retainers are put back into their correct orientation as a stopping element of the slide design.

Case studies...

Aluminium slide for access to heavy equipment in train

Accuride’s distribution partner in the Czech Republic, Arcus Engineering, has been working closely with Kolejové pohony, a.s. to provide a viable...

> Read more

Aluminium slide for access to heavy equipment in train

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